Pantry | Myrtle House

I hate to admit it, but I watch quite a bit of HGTV. Like a lot. Fixer Upper marathon + a glass of wine = heaven. It seems that some house hunting show is usually on during the evenings, and I have picked up on the fact that people searching for a new home love a big 'ol pantry. Honestly, I never quite understood this wishlist item. Maybe it is because we don't have children, or because neither of us really like to cook, so we don't normally have tons of spices and ingredients on hand. Sadly, most of our meals come from the freezer... (don't judge me).

When the Myrtle House budget starting spiraling out of control, Brian and I decided to nix the half bath (who needs 3.5 baths anyways?) and turn that space into a pantry. It was a win-win as it was helpful to our bottom line but also good for resale value. This turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I think I would have hated having four toilets to clean. Two toilets per household member is a little much, I suppose.

While I am no extreme coupon-er needing a stock pile room or doomsday prepper needing a place to stash my years worth of supplies, I was excited about putting one thing in this newly designed pantry: a coffee bar. Yep, basically a separate room for making coffee. It makes sense, I promise. Coffee is something I make almost every day, so it would be a whole lot easier just to leave this small appliance out all of the time. However, I.hate.small.appliances.on.the.counter, especially coffee pots since they are usually pretty ugly, take up a lot of room, and always leave a dirty mess. First world problems, I know.

The space itself is odd as it is basically an angled closet. Here it is before reno (the little door):

Elizabeth Burns Design

And here is a straight on shot after the new door has been framed.

Elizabeth Burns Design

The location is great since it is right off of the kitchen. My plan is to put a sliding re-claimed glass/wood door up instead of a traditional door and then layout some shelves like below.

Elizabeth Burns Design

Yes, those are sconces. The wiring was already there from the room's previous life plan as a bathroom and I had already bought the fixtures, so the sconces stay. I am pretty sure everyone who is working on the house thinks my plan is completely nuts, but hey, it wouldn't be the first. I think it is going to look super cool to be able to peek through the glass door at this pantry. Kind of like this!

Inexpensive Curtain Rods | Design

If you ever move into a new house without window treatments, that usually becomes your number one priority. Forget painting, forget updating bathrooms, heck - forget running water! A girl needs some privacy. However, purchasing window treatments for an entire house can get pretty pricey at $20-$50 a pop in hardware alone. For the Brooklyn House, we were located downtown and our house was literally six feet from one of our neighbors. I didn't have time to shop around and ended up buying the same satin-nickel curtain rod with glass ball finials from Target for all of the windows. This neighborhood is nicer, so it made more sense to splurge on nicer hardware (a rule I use across the board in renovations).

Elizabeth Burns Design

For the Myrtle House, we have had plenty of time to scour for deals. I realized on our last visit to the house that our large, original windows are in fact 60" wide, so that means we need longer curtain rods than the standard 24"-48" kind (ie more expensive). Bummer.

Elizabeth Burns Design
Elizabeth Burns Design
Elizabeth Burns Design

I first started the shopping search online, and then after becoming desperate, started looking into DIY options. (PVC or electrical conduit?) I came across a link of a cute curtain rod from Hobby Lobby of all places. At $7.99 each, I think they are a steal. I have seen them marked down 30% online, but I know Hobby Lobby also circulates a 40% off coupon quite often. (Click the images to link to the product pages).

Another unexpected curtain rod treasure trove was at Ross! I actually ended up buying all of the needed curtain rods for the Myrtle House (minus two) for $40 total. They are not fancy or tremendously ornate, but given the area and price point of the house, they are a perfect fit. Plus I know that we will not have to sleep with one eye open due to lack of privacy those first few nights. :) If your budget is a little grander than our Myrtle House budget, check out HomeGoods. They have lovely hardware at very reasonable prices.

Elizabeth Burns Design

When it comes to window treatments, do you splurge or try to save? Any other stores I should check out?